This page, WRITE TO A PICTURE, is an invitation to our regular writers and to our visitors. Send an original poem, a story, or your recollections. Share your thoughts and experiences with those who like to READ what others write. Send to me at LaraOct7@aol.com.

 Early 'Write To A Picture' pages are archived. The links are here:

Beach Scene "1" Old Train Station "2"
The Carousel "3" The Fifties "4"
Summer Picnic "5" From The Heart "6"
Cloudy Moon "7" September Morn "8"
Passing The Time "9" Apples "10"
Rain "11" Pumpkins "12"
Halloween "13" Big City "14"
Remembrance Day "15" Autumn Harvest "16"
A Cozy Nook "17" Migration "18"
The Kitchen On Memory Lane "19" Holding Hands "20"
Indoor Gardening "21" Playing In The Snow "22"
Bonding With Children "23" ~Reserved~



 


Bonding With Children

By Marilyn (LaraOct7@aol.com)







Most children have a way of melting your heart and if you aren't careful, their smiles, angelic faces, and big eyes will have you spoiling them rotten. Many times we'll buy things and do things for our grandchildren that we wouldn't have thought of doing for our own children.

We bond with children in many ways. We read to them, we attend their sports events, we take them on vacations, we let them help us with our chores. We tell them stories and we listen to their concerns. It is my belief that if we bond with children when they're young, we'll be close when they're in their teens. And if we like children, we will have bonded with our own children, our grandchildren, and the neighborhood children.

I remember when our next door neighbor's little boy was five years old and attending day care. Since both parents worked, he would usually come home to an empty house. One day it snowed and the snow was still falling when little Daniel left the center. I had left school early (the school where I taught) that day and was having a cup of tea when I heard a knock on my door. It was Daniel. His nose was runny, his cheeks were red, and he told me his socks were wet.

I felt so sorry for him. I invited him in and promptly removed his boots and shoes. I put his socks in the dryer and while they were drying, Daniel and I played 'I Spy'.

Daniel knocked on my door many times after that and we would sit at the table and play games, or we would sing. He's married now and has a little boy of his own, but he has never forgotten the times we spent together.

I have strong bonds with my three grandsons, too, and I could go on and on about the things we've done together. Instead, how about some musings of your own? Fiction or fact, we look forward to your entry.






 


Bonding With Children

Joy (JOY3032@aol.com)





When my first two grandchildren stayed with me (we now have 7), they would beg and plead for me to tell them stories....not read them. They wanted me to conjure up a story to make them wonder and laugh and retell many times. This was not an easy task and I soon began to tire of trying to think of things that would entertain them.

Daniel would say "Gramma, don't tell a real story...tell us something interesting". Because these children were close in age, and very good playmates, I would tell and Kelsey and Daniel story most of the time.

The one they loved the best went something like this:

Daniel was going to go to school and Kelsey had to be left behind because she was a year younger and wouldn't go until next year. When they awoke it was raining buckets outside and Daniel was apprehensive about his new bus trip. He dawdled over breakfast and took his time putting on his clothes. Kelsey followed around like a little shadow. He balked at wearing his raincoat, hat and boots (all bright yellow), but I insisted and he reluctantly put them on.

I went outside to check on the bus. When I came in he started for the door and I said, "Have a good day and don't jump in all the puddles". He ignored me and went out to get the bus. I waved and waved as he left for his "big day". When I got in the house I started to clear the breakfast dishes. I looked next in the bedroom to see where Kelsey was...I couldn't find her there or anywhere.

In the meantime (remember this is a story) Daniel went into the school and started down the hall to his class. He was followed like the Pied Piper by all the children giggling and laughing out loud. The rain rolled off his coat and his four boots....."four boots?" " What?"

Well, it seems that when I was busy looking for the bus, Kelsey was putting on her boots and getting under Dan's voluminous yellow raincoat. She had her first trip to school that morning too.

Dan's teacher called and told me to come and get my granddaughter. She might be anxious to start school, but she must wait another year.

The two children squealed and laughed and embellished the story. Every night after that when they would stay with me, they would say "Grandma, tell us the story of the day Kelsey went to school". I half think they began to believe it was a real event. We now talk about it as they are 20 and 22 and they tell me they hope they can tell such good stories to their children when they come along.








 


Bonding With Children

Amy (Fabulousfilly@aol.com)





cookies, cakes, and all sweet things
children remember. baking these treats
with grandma and mother, taking off their rings,
mixing the dough, making it sweet


tasting the cookies, oh so hot
oh i love them, believe it or not
let's bake some more,
mom says what for?


we love to bake with you and grandma,
it bonds us together, we don't feel so small.
so lets get together, bake a bake
cookies and breads and fabulous cake..









 


Bonding With Children

Swampetta (SWAMPETTA@aol.com)





We must never fool ourselves by thinking that it is our job to instruct a child.
Life is what gives the instructions. Life and how we deal with it.
We can show them the beauty of the sunshine and the smell of the flowers.
Then let them see the moon rising and how to welcome dreams.
And why spiders have their own kind of beauty, just like herons.
When we get older it is their turn to teach us.
Let them lead the way to the mud puddles.
How to blow bubbles that burst and get stuck to your hair,
And how to laugh at things we must find humor in,
Even when it's well hidden.
When you bond with a child, you leave pieces of yourself with them.
And if you do it right...pieces of them are stuck to you.
Forever.









 


Bonding With Children

Barbara (Brierhillbarbara@aol.com)





BIRTHDAYS, HOLIDAYS OFF TO GRANDMA'S HOUSE WE GO.
AS WE AGE, TIME FLIES.
THE CHILDREN BRING THEIR CHILDREN AND COME TO GRANDMA'S.
GRANDPOP DIED FIVE YEARS AGO SO THE LIL ONES DON'T REMEMBER HIM WELL.
EACH TIME WE GET TOGETHER I AM AWARE HOW WE ALL ARE CHANGING, CONSTANTLY.
SOME GROWING TALLER, OTHERS GETTING GREYER, AND THEN THE NEW BABIES.
DYLAN MUST THINK HE IS A FOOTBALL AS WE PASS HIM ABOUT FROM ONE TO ANOTHER.
HE IS ONLY 2 MONTHS OLD, THE GRANDDAUGHTERS ARE 4, 6, AND 7.
THE OTHER GRAND SON IS FOUR.

THE CHILDREN HAVE BONDED WITH EACH OTHER AND I WATCH WHO THEY ARE DRAWN TO.
THE ADULTS, ONE TIME IT IS UNCLE JOHN.
NEXT TIME IT IS UNCLE LEE.
THEY COME TO THE LADIES PRETTY EVENLY, NO SPECIALS EXCEPT FOR GRANNDMA.
SHE IS THE NURTURING ONE.
HUGS AND KISSES AND TICKLES.
I SEE THEY ARE DRAWN TO THEIR AUNTS FOR GAMES.
THEY SEEM TO KNOW WHO HAS A CHILD INSIDE.
MY CHILD TIRES EASILY THESE DAYS.
MY OLDEST GRANDDAAUGHTER JUST CELEBRATED HER 7TH BIRTHDAY.
SHE WANTED A BIBLE OF HER OWN.
SO I GOT HER A BIBLE STORY BOOK AND A BIBLE TOO.
THEN I PURCHASED HER A DREAM BOOK.
ALL ABOUT FAIRIES AND PRINCES AND PRINCESSES,
CASTLES TOO.
IN THE SAME THOUGHT I GAVE MY SON MY OLD WORN BIBLE
WITH THE NOTES I LEFT IN THERE.
BONDING TAKES A LITTLE WHILE BUT KIDS CAN'T BE FOOLED, SO JUST BE HONEST.
DON'T FORGET THE WHISPERED I LOVE YOUS WITH A HUG AND A KISS ON THE CHEEK.









 


My Granddaughter

Doris (Toto38@aol.com)







Becoming a grandmother for the first time, at the age of forty-one, was quite a surprise for me. But one of the most delightful experiences of my life.

Jessica Lianne; reddish blonde curly hair, big blue eyes and a giggle that set everyone to laughing. With Jessica's birth I inherited another name, Nana : ) and I took it quite seriously! She was the sunshine in my days and we got along so well. From the beginning we 'bonded' and the bond has grown stronger over her twenty-six years.

When I babysat, which was as often as asked, I sang songs to Jessica that my mother sang to me. Besides "Rock-a-bye Baby" there was "I Don't Know Why I Love You Like I Do", "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" and "You Are My Sunshine". Jessica learned the words, a little at a time, and would sing along with me. From there we went to Nursery Rhymes and stories. Old Mother Hubbard, Old Woman in a Shoe, Peas Porridge Hot, Three Little Bears, Cinderella, and many others. She would clap her hands each time I brought out the books and headed for the rocker.

Now, Jessica is a grown woman, planning her wedding this year. Our close bonds have grown stronger with each passing year and I look forward to bonding with her children one day. : )








 


Bonding With Children

Sharon (Sunyskys1943@aol.com)





My parents both worked when I was a child. And both grandmothers and one grandfather were no longer living. Two brothers and a sister were much older than I and were given the duty of keeping me out of trouble. Well they were good at that. They would tattle if I strayed. So I didn't stray. But nobody read to me.

I was very shy and quite happy to be alone. Along with Tex my dog, books were my best friends. I would sit in my room or under a tree and read to my heart's content. Being quite nearsighted, the books stayed close to my nose, but still I absorbed them. Why nobody caught onto my vision problems is a mystery. How could anyone miss it when the book was held so close to my face?

By the time I was twelve years old, most of the children's books in our local library had been read by me. Then the school held an eye exam. When asked to read the letters on the chart, I said I could see a fuzzy E. That was all. My parents took me to an eye doctor and I got my first pair of glasses. From failing spelling, I went to 100% on my spelling tests. Too bad that didn't follow me to adulthood. Now I can misspell with the best of the people who can't spell. I suppose that is just carelessness on my part.

I do remember traveling from California to Upstate New York, and being left in the care of an aunt who had no children of her own. She spoiled all her nieces and nephews with cuddling and special experiences.

One year while visiting her, she had me pick apples from her orchard. Then we together, cooked them into applesauce with peppermint sticks in it to add flavor. That was fun for me. I can't ever remember before that time, having applesauce with peppermint sticks added.

Another year was at blueberry picking time. Oh the purple face and hands I got from that. I ate more than I collected.

She was a teacher for the fourth grade. I was too old to join the class, but she took me to school with her to be an assistant. That was the year my parents went to Washington D.C. We listened to the activities on the radio. Auntie claimed that she could hear my father laughing at something in the audience. And I was sure she was right. He did have a distinctive laugh, so it may very well have been him.

For bonding with children, I am sure that Auntie was the adult who made me feel the most loved. She was a special person and I missed her when she was gone. She should have been a mother. She would have been a marvelous one. But she couldn't have children, so she gave her love to all other children.








 


Bonding With Children

Tom (tomWYO@aol.com)





Bonding, they now it do call, bonding is what we used to call getting along or hitting it off. To me it is that special something between a grandparent and a child, that special something that makes them drawn together. “Pa, pa” or “Nana or Gran,” called that special person who in the small child sees something of themselves and the small one’s parent. That love, that special feeling between the young and the old, that special “bond” that draws them together with a mutual admiration and respect, a special thing, a special non-event, just the love and mutuality shared.

To the small one it is a person of security, a person who imbibes love and a good feeling and with whom they feel so loved and secure.

To the elder it is holding and feeling a small bundle of joy; holding and being near their now grown or near grown child who has flown the coop, moved on. It is the feeling of unrequited love, the mutual caring and understanding. Remembrances of things past, remembrances of the good things they experienced a long while ago.

Yes “bonding” as they now call it is just old fashioned love and mutual admiration.








 


Bonding With Children

Tom (tomWYO@aol.com)





It started with playing
The boos and peek-a-boo,
Then it was outside with me
As upon the car I did work.


There under the car with a wrench
In his tubby hands,
Helping dad
The car to fix.


Walks at an early age,
Just the two of us looking.
Throwing grass as
The lawn I trimmed,


Climbing rocks in Happy Jack,
Cooking over an open fire.
Learning to trout fish
Before kindergarten.


Looking for fossil rocks
In Utah’s hinterlands.
Hiking the Grand Canyon
Climbing a snow-capped mountain.


Camping all over the US and Canada,
Doing cub scout experiments
Always trying something,
Being together


Helping old dad a judo class teach
While in Junior High
Or at a tournament winning.


Just simple things,
Things poor folks do,
But as a family,
Four living as one.


Fundamental respect,
Truth and honesty,
Right from wrong
And a little loving.









 


Bonding With Children

Mary (MusingByMary@aol.com)





I bonded with mine,
from one ~ two ~ three . . .
without soundin' braggy,
ALL angels to me ~


The virtues of each
none can compare . . .
David ~ Dana ~ William
in my heart, safely there ~


From infant to toddler,
from youngun' to teen . . .
from teen to adult
heh, you know what I mean ~


Our bond is so strong
that nothing can sever . . .
not time ~ distance ~ death
they're my angels forever ~


I bonded with grands
one ~ two ~ three and four . . .
how much they bless me
could not ask for more ~


From infant to tot
Tony ~ Gordon ~ Joseph ~ Josh . . .
we've been bonding since their birth
by golly ~ by gosh ~


Great~grandmother, me?
can't stop 'em I bet . . .
I've bonded with Karson Elizabeth
and Harlee Michelle, we're set ~


Angel~princes, Landon and Walker,
precious angelprincess, Gracee Paige . . .
each calls me "mam~mam"
how darlin' at my age ~


"Mam~mam" will soon bond with
angelprincess number four . . .
Kadence Ruth is her name
she's knockin' at the door ~


What a great honour
being named after me . . .
BONDING WITH CHILDREN
is as wonderful as can be!


Mary Carter Mizrany©

January 16, 2007









 


Bonding With Children

Norma (Twi1ite@sbcglobal.net)





I thought I had no thoughts for the Write to a Picture page this time, since I am very seldom around children. I have two little great-grandchildren I see at Christmas time and they are inundated with bought toys. What I have to offer now would have little meaning to them at their tiny age. How can I say this?

Generations bond with children like my parents did with mine, teaching them the simple things that they knew to entertain them. When I wrote this I wrote it for the message board, but began to think of the simple home made things they handed down and through me to my children. And in the case of my daughter to little school children.

Funny story. My children were being kept by their grandmother across town. She made some "postmen's bags" for them out of paper sacks and strong string over their shoulders. She put her old, and I do mean old, Christmas cards in them, and they played postman. But....when they came home they didn't stop. They delivered those old Christmas cards to my neighbors. My neighbors didn't have a clue why they got cards addressed to my parents. I hardly knew my neighbors, much less their knowing my parents! Needless to say, they were concerned about getting opened mail, taped it up and dropped it back into their boxes marked "not at this address." My parents got a few of their old Christmas cards back - then they were confused. That's a roundabout!

Lost generations have bonded through us to our own, and many happy hours have been spent by working with our hands together whether cooking, coloring or a myriad of other things.

Not many know how to embroider these days. She does.

No one knows how to make paper bead necklaces. She does.

Beaded watch fobs are passe, but we can make them.

And a few little girls still spend a dress-up afternoon with mother's dresses, or with cutting out paper dolls from fashion catalogues.

My sons have no children, but if they did, they would know how in a pinch to make them an indian tomtom from an oat meal box and a bow and arrow from a supple stick and a string.

They would know how to spread a sheet over the chairs and play campout on rainy days.

Their paw paw taught them how to make a sling shooter as well as how to use a hammer and nails and saw. He used to say "There's nothing wrong with boys that a good work table and tools won't fix".

If children never use the simple pleasures they grew up with, they have rich remembrances of certain times that were special for them, and if they do use them, they, too, have bonded with the future.








 


There's Magic in the Sound of My Name

Evelyn (Evenccw@aol.com)






"The old home place - site of my early bonding!"



Family ties are very precious to me. I recall my early bonding with aunts and uncles when they came to visit us on the farm. As I played with my cousins I forged lifelong bonds with them. I even bonded with those who were more than twice my age. We were a large extended family and there were fifty five first cousins. What I remember most was how my aunts treated me and they bonded with me as a child and how important they made me feel. The most important thing they could do was call me by my name. “Evelyn, how big you've grown!” “Evelyn, what grade are you in?” Evelyn, what is your teacher’s name?” And so forth. Oh, how important they made me feel!

There was something magical about the sound of my mother’s laughter. I loved the sound of her voice. There were four of us siblings, just four and one half years separating us in age. I am the oldest. Whenever she settled down for some quiet time we liked to gather around and beg, “Mama, tell us a story Tell us about the times that you went to see your Grandma and Grandpa when you were a little girl”. This fascinated us because our grandmothers died before we were born. When we would vie to sit next to her, she would say, “It’s too bad that I have only two sides!”

I never had a grandmother, but I had my Aunt Liz. She had eight children, all surviving. Our early childhood bonding continues to this day. Aunt Liz died at 99. When she was 90 I wrote, in part:


A life without Aunt Liz is unthinkable, even tragic.
She has been my aunt, my friend–but
Most importantly, she has been my magic.
She saw the good in me when others saw the bad.
She saw beyond the rebel in me and spoke
to the child who was frightened
And lonely and sad.


We have a special bond,
Aunt Liz and I.
She is love, life and hope to me
and at this point I sigh–
When I am with my Aunt Liz I can be me,
whether I laugh or whether I cry.



Through the years as my family came along, I always remembered the precious sound of my name. I never gave my children nicknames. I love the sound of their names, the names that bonded me to them forever–John, Vivian, Marcia, Maureen, Sheila and Karen. For many years that was how I signed my Christmas cards.

I have learned that bonding is not smother love. I have learned that I must love someone enough to let them go, to be whom they are meant to be. As for my children, when I look at my twelve beautiful grandchildren, in whom I take great joy, I feel that I must have done some pretty good bonding along the way. Each and every one of these beautiful young people call me “Granny.” When they add a grin, a hug, it is like a benediction. I am truly blessed.

The bonding that I was privileged to experience as a child through the love of parents, aunts and uncles is manifested in the relationships that I have with my cousins today. When they say, “Y’all come!” I’m inclined to take them seriously. A year does not pass that I don’t connect with my roots in Alabama. I am so thrilled that I CAN go home again! Cousin Anne’s house is built on the land homesteaded by our great grandfather–right across the road from the old house where I was born. This poem was written as a “bread and butter” note for my cousins’ hospitality after a visit with them:


Thanks for the Southern Hospitality



Cousin Ann’s house, near my old home place,
Is nestled in the woods and it was a grace
To be greeted with unbridled southern hospitality
By Ann, Martha, and Therese, my cousins three
It was nothing less than pure, wholesome bliss
To visit, talk about old memories and reminisce.
About being ‘double cousins’ and our childhood years,
Our parents hopes for us and our school days’ peers.
The past, the present and the future filled the range
Of our recollections of how things have changed


Together we stepped across two “welcome” mats.
First. at Carolyn and Bill’s and their house of cats.
Cousin Millie wined and dined us with great rapport
As Cousin Junior fed us with helpings of family lore.
It was ten days of bliss and shooting the breeze
While the scent of privet blossoms made us sneeze.
We’ve all seen childhood, youth and adulthood pass
Ebbing through time’s unrelenting hour glass
How swiftly, it seems, the years have flown
Scarcely here, then even as we speak, already gone.


What a gift it is that we love one another
Not as “cousin,” but as “sister” and as “brother.”
We are all family, each a link in the chain
Now, as we join our hearts , let us maintain
The spirit of our stalwart ancestors’ hopes and fears
And their untold hours of joys and tears
Don't you agree that it is by some grand design
That in this land of kudzu and honeysuckle vines
That we can claim the same pedigree–
Each a unique leaf on our pioneer family tree?









 


Grandma's Pride

By Marty (mjford19@aol.com)





I want to hold and comfort you
To sing a lullaby, or hum a favorite tune
To read your special nursery rimes
And watch your face, as I acted out the sounds
To share in your excitements
And listen to your dreams
To help you overcome your fears
And not to be afraid, of trying new things
I want to listen,to stories, of old and new
To help you make decisions, that might be troubling you
To kiss away your falling tears
Or soften a sigh, my heart could feel
To build our special memories
To capture each moment, in photo's of your youth.









 

 

 

 



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In the meantime, click the links below for
poems and stories by our other authors.


January Beauty

Heart To Heart

Shadows Among The Mist

Simply Lie

When I Close My Eyes




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